Archive for the ‘Indiana’ Category

November 17, 2017: Full Circle   Leave a comment

“Back and better than ever”
-Mike Greenberg, thousands of mornings from 2000-2017

Note: I really wanted this post to be more timely, but it’s been a very hectic several weeks.  I hope to get one or two more posts out today after this one because I have a lot on my mind.

On September 27, 1999, when I started my career with the US Census Bureau at the Chicago Regional Office, ESPN Radio’s Mike & Mike in the Morning was still fourteen weeks away from debuting.  It would be another sixteen weeks before I discovered the show that got me through my morning commute to the Census Bureau in three different cities over the next 17½ years.

Friday, November 17, marked the end of one era and the beginning of another.  As ESPN goes through a series of reorganizations of on air talent and programming, that day was the last day that Mike Golic and Mike Greenberg hosted their iconic morning show together before moving on to new and separate shows.  It was also the same day that, due to my previous decision to transfer back to the Chicago Regional Office, our family moved into our new home in Munster, Indiana.

On both the first and last days I ever listened to Mike & Mike in the Morning, I commuted back and forth to the same office (though the office itself did move in the meantime).  While their show was a constant for all those years, my life sure did change quite a bit.  I went from being single and living alone to married with two kids, and too many ups and downs along the way to count.

While I have been very frequently been sternly reminded by a higher power, usually through messages delivered by others, that I am not in full control of my life, I do both hope and believe that I am now settled in a home that will see my kids graduate from high school and my eventual retirement.  While I have visited, semi-regularly attended, and regularly attended many churches over the years, for the first time I’m actually attending a church that I truly feel called to be a part of.  I very strongly believe that I am where I am for a very important purpose, though I don’t know exactly what that is yet.

I’m anxious to reach the point where I’m ‘settled in’ and can start getting more involved in my church and community.  If you live in the Munster/Hammond/Lansing area and happened upon this post I’d love to make some local connections via Facebook and/or LinkedIn.

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Posted December 3, 2017 by Andrew Cabiness in Family, Indiana, Sports

10 Places I Will Miss in Southern IN/Louisville   Leave a comment

Only six more days until I move north.  Before I go, I would like to mention ten places that my family and I will miss about this area (aside from this really awesome house that’s for sale).  Some are local, others are chains that just aren’t in the Chicago area as of now.  I was having a hard time ranking them, so I took the easy way out and listed them alphabetically.

Buckhead Mountain Grill – Very good menu variety and quality with prices comparable to an Applebee’s or Friday’s without the chain feel.  The Jeffersonville location has a great view of the river and of Downtown Louisville.

Bubba’s 33 – A fairly new chain that has a location in Clarksville.  If you like bacon on your burgers, you’ll love Bubba’s because they not only put bacon on the burger, they put bacon in the burger.  My only complaint is that the beer selection tilts too heavily towards lagers and IPAs.  Still, I’m hoping this chain one day makes its way to NWI (Northwest Indiana).

Churchill Downs – I was never into horse racing at all before moving to Southern Indiana, but I love it now.  We’ve never actually made it to the Oaks or Derby because seats are expensive and the infield just isn’t my thing, but we’ve been to the Downs to see (and bet on) races on other days and we’ve loved it.  The movie in the museum is fantastic as well.

Floyd County Brewing Company – This is a fairly new place in downtown New Albany that quickly became a favorite.  Excellent beer, excellent atmosphere and good food.  Not an easy-to-find combination.

Graeter’s – Really, really, really good ice cream.  You know it’s really, really, really good because it’s expensive and people still buy it.  I’ll probably lose weight faster by not living within a mile of a Greater’s.

Huber’s Orchard and Winery – I will admit that our trips to Huber’s became less frequent when they got rid of the animals that the kids loved to visit, but the winery and farm market are still worth a few trips each year.  Heritage is still my favorite dry red I’ve ever had.

Pizza King – If you have kids who like pizza and like trains, the “the place where the train brings your drinks” is probably someplace you frequent.  I was surprised to learn that their footprint does not include NWI.

Rite Aid – What? A drugstore?  What’s special about Rite Aid that you can’t get at Walgreen’s or CVS.  Well, when you spend $1000 or more per year at Rite Aid you get a 20% discount on everything (except alcohol, tobacco, lottery and prescriptions) all year long.  Plus, Norman, who manages the Rite Aid at 10th and Holmans in Jeffersonville is the best store manager I’ve ever met.  If everybody had the same enthusiasm for their job that he has for his, the world would be a much better place.

Turtle Run Winery – It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles that Huber’s has, but they have a large selection of really good wines made and sold by a family that’s very knowledgeable and passionate about wine.  Well worth the trip to eastern Harrison County.

World of Beer – On my first trip back to the area after moving away, this is the very first place I will want to go for food and drink.  It’s a fantastic place, and thanks to the new East End Bridge it’s now in a fantastic location for those coming from Indiana.  They have tablets at the tables where you can browse beers by type or country.

Any local places that you think should be included on this list?

 

 

 

Posted August 11, 2017 by Andrew Cabiness in Family, Indiana

92nd of 92   Leave a comment

Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, was a French aristocrat and military officer who fought on the side of the colonies in the American Revolutionary War.  In recognition of his accomplishments, there are many cities, towns and counties throughout the United States named Lafayette, LaFayette, La Fayette and Fayette.  Among the most notable of such places are Lafayette, Louisiana, and Lafayette, Indiana.  Among the least notable of such places is Fayette County, Indiana.

 Fayette County has an official population of 24,277, with the county seat of Connersville containing over half the population of the county.  Until yesterday, Fayette County was the only county in Indiana that I had never visited.  Mostly as a result of having lived in six different counties in various parts of the state, I had visited nearly all of Indiana’s 92 counties though the normal course of travel.  The vast majority of counties either contained places or were on the way to/from places I would go as I lived in different parts of the state.  After moving to Jeffersonville in 2006, the number of counties that I hadn’t visited started to shrink very rapidly.  Once the number got below ten, it became a goal of mine to visit the remaining counties so that I could claim to have visited every county in Indiana.  Over the past few years, those handful of counties that weren’t on the way to/from somewhere but not too far out of the way became slight detours from the normal travel routes until only one county remained unvisited:  Fayette County.

 I have nothing against Fayette County.  It just happens to not be on the way to/from wherever I have been going, nor has it even been close to on the way given the places that I have lived.  I figured I’d eventually take a trip from somewhere to somewhere that went close enough to Fayette County that I could detour there and finally cross #92 off my list.  However, when I recently decided to accept a job transfer to the Chicago area, I figured my chances of ever being near Fayette county would diminish significantly.  So, with a day off yesterday and the kids in school, I decided to make a five-hour round trip, just for the purpose of visiting Fayette County and finally being able to claim that I have visited every county in Indiana.

I would love to hear from anybody else who has managed to visit all 92 counties.

fayette

Posted August 9, 2017 by Andrew Cabiness in Geography, Indiana

Major Announcement   3 comments

Ever since my parents took me to my first White Sox game when I was 9, I’ve loved Chicago.  I always imagined I would end up living there someday.  I considered going to college at DePaul before choosing Notre Dame.  I almost went to graduate school at UIC before settling on Michigan State.  I did eventually end up in Chicago for 5½ years when I began my Census Bureau career.  When I left by accepting a transfer to Maryland, and then to here in Southern Indiana, I thought I would be back.  Twelve years and two kids later, the idea of returning to Chicago began to seem less and less likely.

However, and opportunity has presented itself, and after some very serious and careful consideration, I have decided to accept a transfer back to the Census Bureau’s Chicago Regional Office, located in Oak Brook.  Nearly all of the details are yet to be worked out, but my first day there is tentatively scheduled for Monday, August 21.  My eleven years of working for the Bureau’s Jeffersonville (NPC) office have been both rewarding and challenging, and I feel that I am at a point in my career where I need a change of scenery.

We have just barely begun the process of looking for a new home, so I can’t yet tell you where we will be living, but we are focused on the western portions of Lake County, Indiana.  As a native Hoosier, I am partial to my home state and living in Illinois doesn’t seem terribly appealing right now.  Still, I want the commute to not be any lengthier than necessary, thus western Lake County.  I will provide more details once they are determined.

Even though I’ve lived in Southern Indiana for 11 years now, I’ve always favored the northern part of the state over the southern.  There are people and things about this area that I will miss, but the opportunity to take full advantage of everything Chicago far outweighs that for me.  More/better cultural opportunities, closer to White Sox games, closer to Notre Dame football games (which only becomes relevant after they wake up and ditch their coach) and closer to a beach.  Also, you may find this weird, but I’m very excited to be moving back to the Central Time Zone, which is what all of Indiana should be on anyway.

My wife and children have developed strong bonds that will have to be severed, and I am very appreciative that they are supporting this move as one that will be best for the family even though not their personal preference.  My wife will have to leave a job and co-workers that she absolutely loves.  The kids will both have to change schools again, leave behind friends, and find new Cub and Girl Scout packs/troops.  I want to especially thank the babysitters, preschool teachers, elementary school teachers, Sunday school teachers and scout leaders who have all been a very important influence on the first 9 and 7½ years of our children’s lives.  Perhaps the most important challenge that my wife and I face in this move is finding and selecting the right people to fill these new roles for our children.

While there are still a lot of uncertainties that are the source of anxiety right now, I am very excited to start the next chapter of my career and life.  I have updated and will continue to update my About page as we sort out exactly where we are going to live.

Lake_County,_Indiana_map.svg

 

Posted July 13, 2017 by Andrew Cabiness in Family, Indiana

Stealing Away and Leaving GCCS Behind   Leave a comment

In December 2014, Greater Clark County Schools board member Teresa Bottorff-Perkins pled guilty to felony shoplifting in Tennessee.  Fifteen months later, she is still a board member.  I find this unacceptable.  I can’t understand why the superintendent, the other six board members, and the teachers and parents of the school district don’t also find this unacceptable.  I’m not one to suggest that we all shouldn’t be perfect and mistakes can’t be forgiven, but I also think that the people who make critical educational decisions for kids really need to be held to a high standard.  I try to teach my students that there are consequences for their actions.  I assume that GCCS teachers also teach students that there are consequences for their actions.  Apparently school board members believe that they are above consequences.

There are elections coming up in November, and it’s entirely possible that Ms. Bottorff-Perkins will lose her seat.  However, we have reached a point where we need to sell our house and move to one that has more room for our family, and I’m not willing to take a chance on the outcome of a future election.  As such, we decided to focus our search outside of the GCCS district.  If we weren’t already going to be making a move, we may have waited out the election and then considered private/charter school options if the felon was indeed reelected.

As of today, we’ve had an offer accepted on a home in Floyd County.  The kids will miss their school and their teachers, but I just couldn’t bring myself to consider homes within the district.  In the big picture my actions will probably have little impact on GCCS, but I need to follow my conscience.

Am I being unreasonable?

Posted March 15, 2016 by Andrew Cabiness in Indiana, Politics

Tim Brown and Jerome Bettis, HOF   Leave a comment

As is tradition, the new class of Canton’s Pro Football Hall of Fame is announced the day before the Super Bowl.  Two Notre Dame players with outstanding NFL careers finally received that honor yesterday, after waiting far longer than they should have.

There is very little argument with Bettis.  He racked up elite rushing totals while playing most of his career for a very popular and successful franchise.  At least in Indiana, there is quite a bit of noise that Marvin Harrison deserved to go in the HOF as a receiver ahead of Tim Brown.  If you are entirely ignorant of the history of the NFL before Peyton Manning arrived in Indianapolis, it’s a pretty easy argument to buy into.  Harrison benefited from playing in a much more pass-freindly era, and benefited from playing with arguably the greatest quarterback of all-time.

Tim Brown played in a much less pass-friendly era, with a whole bunch of less pass-friendly quarterbacks.  It’s pretty easy to see that there are a lot of reasons other than the respective value of each receiver as to why Harrison was able to rack up much better career numbers than Brown.  On top of that, Tim Brown put his body on the line to return punts and kickoffs 375 times.  Marvin Harrison put his body on the line to return punts and kickoffs 21 times.

Tim Brown played for 16 years in Oakland with Jay Schroeder, Jeff Hostetler, Jeff George, Rich Gannon and Rick Mirer as his quarterbacks and he’s still in the HOF.  If Marvin Harrison had to play 16 years with those quarterbacks, you’d have forgotten who he is by now.

TimBrown

Posted February 1, 2015 by Andrew Cabiness in College Football, Indiana, NFL, Notre Dame

You’re Willing to Sacrifice Our Love   Leave a comment

It’s supposed to get very cold soon in much of the US.  “Cold As Ice,” one might say.  The precise forecast is changing by the hour, but the current National Weather Service forecast for my particular location suggests a high Monday of -2 with a low of -8.  That’s pretty cold.  Not as cold, however, as the low of -21 in South Bend on January 19, 1994.

I remember that day.  It was a Wednesday.  It was the third day of the second semester of my sophomore year at Notre Dame.  Every school at every level within 100 miles had cancelled classes.  Except Notre Dame.  I don’t know why we had classes.  It wasn’t fun.  I do know that it was the only time in my 3½ years at Notre Dame that I ever set foot in the art building, because it was part of a string of buildings between Cavanaugh Hall and DeBartolo Hall, and no number of extra steps inside buildings was too much to justify minimizing the number of steps outside buildings.

Nobody died that day at Notre Dame.  It was brutally cold, but we all survived.  Over 250,000 people live in Yakutsk, Russia, where the average January high is -31 and the record January high is +22.  I’m not suggesting that sub-zero temperatures are anywhere near pleasant or desirable, but having one day where the temperatures are expected to be a bit below zero does not call for the panic that is gripping the area.  I went to the grocery store this morning to do the usual weekly grocery shopping.  I got the usual weekly amount of bread and milk.  No matter how bad things get the next few days, the temperature is expected to be in the 40s by next weekend.  I can’t comprehend a circumstance that might require me to need lots of extra bread and milk.

Now, there are places farther north that are expected to get an extraordinary combination of snow and cold.  I do hope everybody is prepared for the possibility to be stuck inside for a few days.  I also hope that you are finding a spot inside for outdoor pets.

Posted January 4, 2014 by Andrew Cabiness in Indiana, Notre Dame

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